Category Archives: Cheap Moncler Jackets

Why we’re all in quilted cheap Moncler jackets

Fashion blogger Lisa Hahnbück wearing a black quilted jacket by Moncler, one of the brands most responsible for popularising the trend.

They used to be reserved for ski slopes and the school playground but now the quilted coats originally known as Puffa jackets have been embraced by the masses. In 2018 the search engine Lyst, which features 12,000 brands and retailers, reported a 59% year-on-year rise in searches for them, declaring them a global bestseller.

Their popularity chimes with the rise in sportswear and “normcore” – the trend that sees designers mining everyday items to drench high fashion in irony. Where once hiking boots were functional footwear and anoraks were most commonly associated with trainspotting, thanks to big-name brands such as Balenciaga and Louis Vuitton, they are now two of the trendiest items to own.

With quilted coats, the reason for increased sales lies largely at the door of Italian brand Moncler, which has redoubled its efforts at making the aesthetic relevant to a new generation through a series of high-profile collaborations.

Last February, Moncler launched its Genius project, for which a group of the world’s most influential designers – including Simone Rocha, Craig Green and Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli – created capsule collections blending their style with the technical expertise of the brand.

Aimed at targeting a growing appetite for newness from global consumers who increasingly – and impatiently – absorb trends through social media, each collection became available in highly publicised monthly “drops”, rather than being traditional seasonal offerings.

Fashion blogger Vanessa Hong in another Moncler jacket.

Last week, the brand announced that, for its third season, returning designers would be joined by two of fashion’s most talked-about creators: the Kanye West protege and Dior Menswear collaborator Matthew Williams of Alyx, and Richard Quinn, who last year was presented with the inaugural Queen Elizabeth award for design at his London Fashion Week show by the monarch herself.

“When talking to customers in a digital world, brands need something unique and strong, and you need to talk to them every day. This monthly strategy is a strong opportunity to change the model of luxury companies like Moncler outlet online,” says chief executive and chairman Remo Ruffini who joined the company in 2003. “These days the mood, the attitude and the energy are more important than the product for me, and perception is much more important than everything … If you are able to mix product and energy, I think that’s a modern company today.”

Ruffini’s strategy of raising the profile of the quilted jacket brand has proven successful so far.

Last year, Moncler’s UK online traffic rose more than 50% each month following the Genius launch, while in the first nine months of the year total sales were up 23%, reaching €872.7m (£674.2m).In turn, one of its largest retailers, Matchesfashion.com, says that it has “seen strong client engagement with the designer collaborations, which has had a positive halo effect across the rest of the Moncler collection,” according to head of womenswear buying Liane Wiggins.

“Moncler is ahead of the game with its motto of ‘one house, different voices’,” says Quinn. “It’s the opposite of one person dictating how things should be done – the modern world is different and there’s a need to work with and support each other.”

Now the trend is trickling down to the high street, where prices are considerably more accessible than Moncler’s £500-plus. Zara, for example, has no fewer than 100 new-season styles across its men’s and womenswear collections from £29.99. It informs customers that they are “ideal for a sporty look and provide extra warmth, while lightweight pieces take up almost no space”. It also points out that that they are “ideal for travelling” – whether on the slopes, or, as is now normal, on a mild daily commute.

Craig Green teams up with Moncler

Craig Green is one of the fashion industry’s biggest successes from the past five years. He has commanded fans in the likes of Drake, Rihanna and, more recently, Pusha T, and is thanked for changing the way that men are changing. Sure, his designs are bold, but they’ve got people interested.

Green’s next move is a major milestone in his career. The 32-year-old Londoner is launching his Genius Project collection – a collaboration with the Italian brand Moncler, which sees the label team up with other designers such as Simone Rocha and Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccoli. Through his collection, Green has reinvented Moncler’s signature puffer jacket in true Green form.

For his collection, Green has created ten looks finished with his aesthetic touchstones. The garments are as brilliantly moody and conceptual as you’d expect. Key pieces include a hybrid of one of Green’s signature quilted worker jackets (“One day we want it to be the case that if you go and get a worker jacket, you go and get a Craig Green worker jacket,” the designer told me. “Just like if you go and get a trench, you’d get a Burberry trench”) and a cheap classic Moncler down jacket. “It’s a bit like a biker jacket bomber,” says Green.

Moncler’s Craig Green Genius Collection Drops this Fall’s Dopest Puffer Jackets

Now more than ever, fashion is a commercial enterprise and a bonafide source of entertainment. Look at Virgil Abloh’s first runway show for Louis Vuitton, which boasted Broadway-level production values and a front row any awards show producer would kill for. Or think about Raf Simons’s Calvin Klein 205W39NYC Fall 2018 spectacle, with balaclava-wearing models stomping through feet of popcorn snow. In 2018, wrapping a new season’s worth of clothes up in an exciting package isn’t just a branding exercise. It’s also necessary to cut through an increasingly crowded fashion field—so long as you can back it up with clothes people can buy and wear on their backs. And these days, few designers grasp this concept as well as Craig Green does.

Green was an early champion of the workwear 2.0 era we’re currently in. Even in his earliest collections, the London-based designer found a way to elevate seemingly simple fabrics into extraordinary silhouettes. The result was everything forward-looking menswear should be: conceptual and cool—and wearable, too. Over the last few years Green has deftly translated his runway showpieces into quilted snap-front nylon jackets and lace-detail sweatshirts that are unmistakably his, but don’t call attention to themselves the way one of his Emporer-Palpatine-on-holiday color-blocked parkas might. It’s a clear understanding of the line between art and commerce—an understanding that Green has also brought to his ongoing partnership with Moncler Outlet.

As part of the brand’s Genius initiative Green was given free reign to develop a puffer-friendly capsule for the Italian brand. The pairing was, for all parties, intuitive: “The idea of protection and functionality are at the heart of what I think Moncler is, whilst also being something that I have always explored in my own work,” Green tells GQ. And when Green showed his collection of sculptural coats, pants, vests, and jackets layered together in towering Michelin Man-like fashion earlier this year in Milan, he made the right kind of waves. “The shapes and forms for come from protective devices and garments; life jackets, life rafts, swimming aids, internal breathing apparatus of spacesuits and isolation tanks,” Green says. And, when layered together, everything gives “the effect of extreme protective garments, or human flotation devices.” In other words: this is absolute unit menswear in its finest form. “I think there is something interesting about the idea of clothing as a protective layer, clothing for a purpose,” the designer says.

Of course, while the purpose of the installation was to show off, as Green puts it, “the pure or most extreme version of the idea behind the collection,” the business of Genius is to sell cheap moncler jackets.

Craig Green understands that the importance of having “this idea and feeling translate to what is found in store” too, and so he funneled the collection’s aesthetic and technical innovations into commercial jackets and knitwear featuring elements and fabrics that mimic details from the show collection. “I have always loved opposing ideas and the tension between two extremes, so exploring the ideas of heavy and light in this collection helped to push the development process further,” Green says. “I think of a cheap Moncler jacket in a similar way, something that has a solid looking form but actually is as light as air.” Two models in particular, the “Glenard” (a bulbous double-hooded white cotton jacket) and the “Halibut” (an oily black matte nylon jacket with vertical channel quilting) call to mind the envelope-pushing shapes of the show pieces but wouldn’t look too out of place on your daily commute. And if you ever encounter the need for a human flotation device that also looks rad on said commute, Green and Moncler have got you covered.